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Research Article | Open Access
Volume 11 2019 | None
Effects of breastfeeding promotion and support programs on breastfeeding initiation, duration, and exclusive breastfeeding rates
Dr Shaik Reshma MD, Dr. N Satish MBBS DNB
Pages: 173-178
Abstract
Background: Breastfeeding is universally recognized as the optimal source of nutrition for infants, offering numerous health benefits to both infants and mothers. Despite these advantages, global breastfeeding rates remain suboptimal, prompting the implementation of various breastfeeding promotion and support programs. Understanding the effects of these programs is crucial for enhancing maternal and child health outcomes. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in diverse healthcare settings, including hospitals, clinics, and community health centers. Convenience sampling was utilized to recruit 100 eligible mothers who had given birth within the past year. Data on participant demographics, breastfeeding practices, exposure to breastfeeding promotion programs, and relevant covariates were collected using a structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, bivariate, and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the association between exposure to breastfeeding promotion programs and breastfeeding initiation rates, while controlling for potential confounding variables. Results: The study found that 80% of mothers initiated breastfeeding, with 60% exclusively breastfeeding at discharge and a mean breastfeeding duration of 6.5 months. Factors influencing breastfeeding initiation included support from healthcare providers, participation in breastfeeding education classes, and social support from family and friends. Forty-five percent of mothers were exposed to breastfeeding promotion programs, with reported effectiveness ratings of 40%. Bivariate and multivariate analyses revealed a significant association between exposure to breastfeeding promotion programs and breastfeeding initiation rates, even after controlling for confounders. Conclusion: This study contributes to the evidence base supporting the effectiveness of breastfeeding promotion programs in enhancing breastfeeding initiation rates among mothers. By identifying effective interventions and understanding their mechanisms, policymakers and healthcare providers can develop targeted strategies to promote breastfeeding and improve maternal and child health outcomes globally.
Keywords
Breastfeeding is universally recognized as the optimal source of nutrition for infants, offering numerous health benefits to both infants and mothers.
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